<div style="display:inline;"> <img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/1028731116/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0">
CHRISTMAS OFFER Subscribe to Lancashire Life today click here

A year in the life of Lakeland’s Scafell Pike

PUBLISHED: 00:00 09 May 2014

An icy morning from Bowfell towards Scafell

An icy morning from Bowfell towards Scafell

mark gilligan

Filmmaker Terry Abraham speaks to Mark Gilligan on his labour of love

Terry with his camera beside Wast Water Terry with his camera beside Wast Water

Those who make their way over to the Lake District’s western fells usually pay homage to Scafell Pike. Arriving on the shores of Wast Water, they will look up and take pictures of England’s highest point, weather permitting. Others will have a personal goal of ascending to its summit.

It is a mountain that draws people from all over the world with its awesome majesty. Outdoors film producer Terry Abraham is no different. It brings him back time and again but his labour of love has gone beyond simply scaling this behemoth of a rock.

In fact, he has been ‘wild camping’ on the open fell through the seasons, recording all he has seen for a new film, The Life of a Mountain: Scafell Pike. It records a year in the life of the peak and the people who live, work, care for and play around this iconic fell.

‘This area is so special to me,’ says Terry. ‘I have a particular feeling for Scafell Pike. There is something about it, something that fascinates me. I just had to make this film.’

Sometimes we experience forced changes in our lives, turning points. It happened several years back for Terry, who was facing Christmas with the prospect of redundancy from his office job.

‘I had been working a normal nine to five job and producing films as a sideline,’ he says. Terry spent weekends making corporate videos and then shooting the material he really loved while camping in the wilds.

‘When my job finished, it was decision time. I knew what I really wanted to do. In fact, it was all I wanted to do but there was a reality check. I discussed it with my wife, Sue, and she supported my decision to give filmmaking a go full-time.’

He invested what money he had left in better equipment and began searching for backers for his project of recording Scafell throughout the seasons. It would concentrate not just on the mountain, but also the people who work on and around it.

‘I had about three to four months redundancy and felt that would be enough time for me to know if it was going to work or not. It was a gamble, very hard but after a year, I had made a living doing what I wanted to do. Having won various amateur awards in the past, I had built up a following on YouTube and other social media sites. The concept of making a film on the mountain was my ambition and the people I approached for sponsorship backed me immediately. I was very honoured they had faith in me.’

In the ‘downtime’ before he started his Lakes adventure, Terry went up to Scotland with the acclaimed writer and back-packer Chris Townsend. They spent a winter shooting what is now one of the most sought-after DVDs of its genre. The Cairngorms in winter is so beautifully crafted you would never know Terry started with a cheap camcorder and has had no formal training.

Even now, Terry doesn’t do things the easy way. Not only does he endure the hardship of living on the fells but just getting to them is tough.

He doesn’t drive so after a train to Seascale, he often walks to the mountain with over 30 kilos of equipment on his back, then makes his way up to various shooting sights on and around the Scafells. While he takes up what he can, Terry has his food delivered to a local inn using a prearranged internet booking service. He comes back down for supplies when they arrive.

Having made camp and settling down with his camera, he then waits. Nature throws up some of the most astonishing spectacles and while we are warm in our beds, he is busy rigging his camera onto a jib and capturing the most evocative, striking images.

‘Sometimes I will be up there for three or four days and the “clag” has prevented anything worthy and then it will just happen. Two or three minutes of what I am seeking and it has all been worthwhile.

‘It is another world. Sunsets and sunrises above the clouds are quite breathtaking. This area draws me. I have a passion for it and so it seemed like an inevitable thing for me to do. I just love it here.

‘I have learnt a lot about myself while doing this. How to cope with being lonely and dealing with situations on my own. It hasn’t been easy but I am lucky to have the support of my wonderful wife.’

The Life of a Mountain: Scafell Pike - which will premiere at Rheged, near Penrith, on May 10. For details call 01768 868000 or visit www.rheged.com

More from Out & About

Friday, November 17, 2017

This remarkable garden can whisk you on a horticulture tour of the world. Linda Viney took a trip

Read more
Monday, November 13, 2017

A fantastic end to 2017 is in store at the annual equestrian event in the centre of Liverpool.

Read more
Monday, November 13, 2017

John Lenehan heads for Gisburn to walk by the Ribble and sample the delights of the Auction Mart Cafe.

Read more
Monday, November 13, 2017

This busy community might sometimes feel like the village that time forgot, but it’s full of people who help themselves. Martin Pilkington reports

Read more
Silverdale
Monday, November 6, 2017

Follow our short guide to a festive trip to Lytham this Christmas.

Read more
Christmas
Monday, November 6, 2017

Windermere is dependent on tourism, but when the holidaymakers have left there remains a thriving village community

Read more
Windermere
Monday, November 6, 2017

The 218th Westmorland County Show welcomed HRH The Prince of Wales

Read more
Thursday, November 2, 2017

Is it a helicopter? Is it a plane? It’s neither. Or maybe both. Paul Mackenzie meets a man offering a unique bird’s eye view of the Lake District.

Read more
Lake District

It may only be a small town, but these home grown products are causing a big stir

Read more
Ormskirk
Wednesday, October 25, 2017

While conservation work is important globally, The Lancashire Wildlife Trust is stressing the need to think locally too. Alan Wright discusses the important of wildlife close to home.

Read more
Lancashire Wildlife
Monday, October 23, 2017

There are many reasons why the Forest of Bowland is designated Area of Natural Beauty, we’ve picked our favourite spots that we think you will love too.

Read more
Bowland
Wednesday, October 18, 2017

The ‘Rural Oscars’ Are Back

Read more
Monday, October 16, 2017

It may not be the Serengeti but the stunning countryside around Nicky Nook will make a perfect location for eco-holidays. Roger Borrell reports.

Read more
Bowland Scorton
Saturday, October 14, 2017

Volunteers are restoring a lovely Victorian garden just a short stroll from a busy city centre. Linda Viney reports

Read more
Liverpool
 
Great British Holidays advert link

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter


Subscribe or buy a mag today

Lancashire Life Application Link

Local Business Directory

Lancashire's trusted business finder

Job search in your local area



Property Search