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5 great horseshoe walks in the Lake District

PUBLISHED: 01:00 07 August 2018 | UPDATED: 09:29 07 August 2018

Between Fairfield and Hart Crag, where the Fairfield and Deepdale Horseshoes coincide (c) Vivienne Crow

Between Fairfield and Hart Crag, where the Fairfield and Deepdale Horseshoes coincide (c) Vivienne Crow

Vivienne Crow

Get away from it all and hit the heights with these great (but challenging) Lakeland rounds

Outdoor writer and photographer Vivienne Crow on the Lake District fells  (c) Vivienne CrowOutdoor writer and photographer Vivienne Crow on the Lake District fells (c) Vivienne Crow

There’s always something special about ridge walking, about having the ground at your feet dropping away on both sides.

It’s an invigorating sensation; and once you’ve set foot on that arched spine of risen earth, soaring above the everyday world, you’ll never want to come down.

So how can we make it last? The answer lies in the great Lakeland rounds, or horseshoe routes – linking together the ridges on either side of a valley, usually via a col. These are tough walks, but they’re perfect for long summer days, when you can stride out along the high ground for hours and hours.

 

Looking across Three Tarns to the Scafells on the way up to Bow Fell  (c) Vivienne CrowLooking across Three Tarns to the Scafells on the way up to Bow Fell (c) Vivienne Crow

Bow Fell and the Mickleden Round

This grand day above Langdale has a variety of terrain and scenery that makes it hard to beat. It completes a high-level circuit of the valley through which Mickleden Beck runs – 9¼ miles with 3600ft of climb.

The Band provides a relatively easy way on to the high fells, from where it’s a short but stony climb on to Bow Fell (2978ft) for a breathtaking perspective on the Scafells. Dropping to Angle Tarn, the walk then ascends Rossett Pike (2106ft) at the head of Mickleden. Coming off this boulder-strewn ridge, it crosses boggy, featureless moorland and then heads for the Langdale Pikes, finally descending via the Mark Gate path.

 

Froswick and Ill Bell on the western arm of the Kentmere Horseshoe  (c) Vivienne CrowFroswick and Ill Bell on the western arm of the Kentmere Horseshoe (c) Vivienne Crow

Kentmere Horseshoe

The Kentmere Horseshoe is one of Lakeland’s classic rounds – and one of its longest. It gives walkers an opportunity for sustained and spectacular ridge walking in wild, remote country on the south-eastern edge of the National Park.

Covering 12 miles and with more than 3500ft of ascent, it visits Yoke (2316ft), Ill Bell (2483ft), Froswick (2362ft), Harter Fell (2552ft) and Kentmere Pike (2394ft). Highlights include the airy summit of Ill Bell with its view of the lonely head of Kentmere, and the dramatic gap of Nan Bield Pass, one of the highest passes in Lakeland.

 

A relatively quiet morning on the normally busy ridge path on to Cat Bells  (c) Vivienne CrowA relatively quiet morning on the normally busy ridge path on to Cat Bells (c) Vivienne Crow

Newlands Round

The 10-mile Newlands Round, which starts near Keswick, is another superb roller-coaster route. Striding out along high, breezy ridges with far-reaching views throughout, walkers take in Cat Bells (1479ft), Maiden Moor (1889ft), High Spy (2142ft), Dale Head (2470ft) and Hindscarth (2385ft).

There are lots of ups and downs along the way – slightly more than 3500ft of them in total – and the terrain includes some clambering on bare rock, so it’s a rugged undertaking, but one that should leave you with some magnificent fell memories that’ll last a lifetime.

 

The Coledale fells seen from Latrigg  (c) Vivienne CrowThe Coledale fells seen from Latrigg (c) Vivienne Crow

Coledale Horseshoe

Like the Newlands Round, the Coledale Horseshoe starts near Keswick. There are many ways to do it – summits that can be added if 9¼ miles and 3880ft of ascent isn’t enough; summits that can be bypassed if it’s all a little too much – but my favourite version climbs Barrow (1492ft), Sail (2535ft), Crag Hill (2752ft), Hopegill Head (2526ft) and Grisedale Pike (2595ft).

Whichever way you choose to do it, there’s always that wonderful feeling of being totally immersed in the mountains as you follow the long ridge lines on either side of the steep-sided valley carved by Coledale Beck.

 

Between Fairfield and Hart Crag, where the Fairfield and Deepdale Horseshoes coincide  (c) Vivienne CrowBetween Fairfield and Hart Crag, where the Fairfield and Deepdale Horseshoes coincide (c) Vivienne Crow

Deepdale Horseshoe

Using Patterdale as its base, this is the Fairfield Horseshoe’s quieter and, in my opinion, far superior cousin. Like the popular Ambleside-based round, it reaches its highest point on Fairfield (2863ft), but it approaches the fell via St Sunday Crag (2759ft) and the exposed, rocky Cofa Pike, both of which provide a chance for gazing across Grisedale to the secretive coves and crags of the Helvellyn range.

The return is via Hart Crag (2696ft) and then along the secluded ridge of Hartsop above How, a grassy spur where you’ll want to linger – if only to delay that moment when you have to return to the ‘real world’. A total of 9½ miles with 3370ft of ascent.

 

Lake District: High Level and Fell Walks by Vivienne CrowLake District: High Level and Fell Walks by Vivienne Crow

Walk on

Vivienne Crow is an award-winning freelance writer and photographer, specialising in all things to do with the outdoors. She has written more than a dozen guides to Cumbria and the Lake District.

All the walks mentioned here are described in full in Vivienne’s book, Lake District: High Level and Fell Walks. Priced £9.99, it includes detailed route directions for 30 graded walks, OS mapping, colour photographs and information about facilities en route. Available in shops, tourist information centres and online.

 

 

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