6 great nature reserves for walking in Lancashire

PUBLISHED: 08:00 18 August 2020 | UPDATED: 08:43 18 August 2020

Brockholes Nature Reserve by Vijay Arogyasami

Brockholes Nature Reserve by Vijay Arogyasami

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Walking is a great way to stay active, lose weight and to get to know the wild and wonderful world around us.

Heron at Brockholes by Kevin McnamaraHeron at Brockholes by Kevin Mcnamara

Brockholes Nature Reserve

The 250-acre nature reserve lies next to junction 31 on the M6, with otters, roe deer, brown hares and a multitude of birdlife landing throughout the year.

Read more about why you should visit Brockholes

The colourful wildflower meadow at Salthill QuarryThe colourful wildflower meadow at Salthill Quarry

Salthill Quarry Local Nature Reserve

Salthill Quarry lies between Clitheroe and Worston and is of special interest to geologists and ecologists alike. A good way to get around Salthill Quarry is using the Geology Trail, a circular walk that takes in 10 of the best spots on the reserve.

Read more about why you should visit Salthill Quarry

Willow Tit by David GilbyWillow Tit by David Gilby

Wigan Flashes Local Nature Reserve

Wigan Flashes lies just a mile-or-so from Wigan town centre with waterfowl & bird hides, plus dog-friendly paths & picnic facilities, there are around 10km of paths around the reserve for you to explore. The area has one of the largest willow tit populations in the UK.

Read more about why you should visit Wigan Flashes

The unusual rabbit rocks were shaped at the bottom of kilnsThe unusual rabbit rocks were shaped at the bottom of kilns

Kirkless Local Nature Reserve

Kirkless can be accessed from Belle Green Lane, in Ince-in-Makerfield. Here you might spots rabbits in attracted bt the shelter of the discarded cylindrical blocks. You can also walk around the hidden gem of a hay meadow and grasslands.

Read more about why you should visit Kirkless Nature Reserve

Haymaking at Heysham MossHaymaking at Heysham Moss

Heysham Moss Nature Reserve

A mosaic of habitats - scrub, wet grassland and raised bog is home to a variety of flowers, birds, bees and butterflies. The nature reserve lies on the east edge of the village, so it would be a great idea to combine this with a walk on the coast. You

Read more about why you should visit Heysham Moss

Orchids brighten Haskayne Cutting in the summer (Picture: Alan Wright)Orchids brighten Haskayne Cutting in the summer (Picture: Alan Wright)

Haskayne Cutting Nature Reserve

The flat landscape of West Lancashire is great for walking, but it is also the county’s agricultural heartland, so it come as no surprise this area near Scarisbrick also has an abundance of habitats such as wildlflower fields. Birds visit throughout the year, with the appearance of redwing and fieldfare in the colder months.

Read more about why you should visit Haskayne Cutting

The Lancashire Wildlife Trust is combining walking and wildlife for a week, August 24-30 – giving you an opportunity to takes steps for nature’s recovery.

During Wild Walk Week, the Wildlife Trust wants families, friends and colleagues to get together and walk one million steps for wildlife.

To find more information please visit the Lancashire Wildlife Trust’s webpage www.lancswt.org.uk/events/wild-walk-week

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